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Yutanpo is still one of the popular tools used to warm up the bedding on winter nights. Yutanpo, or hot water bottle, refers to a heat-retaining tool that is filled with boiling water, wrapped in a sewn cloth, and placed in the bed to warm the legs and waist.

To use a yutanpo, users pour hot water into a kettle, plug it, and put it under a futon to heat the bed at bedtime. In addition to warming the body and legs, users can also place it on the back of a chair or on the knees or feet to warm the legs and waist.

Yutanpo has a long history, dating back to the Tang Dynasty in China in the 7th century, which was initially called "tanpo." The fact that "tanpo" is mentioned in a document dated 1486 shows that it was already in Japan at least in the mid-Muromachi period.

Toward the end of the Pacific War, it became difficult for Japan to secure food, let alone oil, which was essential to the lives of the people. Unable to secure the resources to make weapons, the Japanese military ordered the contribution of everything from what appeared to be metal objects, pots, and kettles found in homes and communities to the ends of fire watchtowers (yagura). During this time, various household items were made to replace metal ones. Ceramic yutanpo was one of them.

In modern times, resin containers and other materials are also used. Microwavable yutanpo, and electric storage and rechargeable yutanpo are also on the market. One of the typical shapes of metal and plastic containers is the wavy turtle-shaped container with a wavy surface. Cylindrical and semi-cylindrical shapes were used, but from around the beginning of the Showa period, corrugated tin and copper koban-shaped ones appeared.

In our store, we offer Ceramic Japan's yutanpÖ. The former is a porcelain hot water bottle that can be heated in the microwave and has a soft, huggable shape. It can be used not only for sleeping, but also in the living room, office, and outdoors. Please have a look at our website for more detail.

Ceramic Japan's yutanpÖ
https://www.shokunin.com/en/ceramicjapan/yutanpo.html

References:
https://crd.ndl.go.jp/reference/modules/d3ndlcrdentry/index.php?page=ref_view&id=1000078832
http://www.yutanpo-fashy.com/history/index.html
https://www.rekimin-sekigahara.jp/main/exhibition/mingu100/mingu-jyuu/100_25.html
https://www.masyuko.or.jp/introduce/history056/
https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%B9%AF%E3%81%9F%E3%82%93%E3%81%BD