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[Yamanaka Lacquerware]

Yamanaka lacquerware is the generic name for lacquerware made in the Yamanaka Onsen area of Kaga City, Ishikawa Prefecture. Gato Mikio Shoten was founded in 1908 as Gato Mokkojo (Woodworks). Inheriting the philosophy of a woodworker, the company has been manufacturing lacquerware with a focus on the perfection of the wood, the base of the lacquerware.

The foundation of Yamanaka lacquerware is the perfection of the wood. Yamanaka lacquerware's wipe lacquer finish, which is a thin coating of lacquer, is a finishing method that requires a good wood base in order to produce a product.

Such thinly lacquered lacquerware is recognized as inexpensive in the market, but the truth is that only Yamanaka lacquerware can produce this type of lacquerware. In contrast to staid lacquerware with thick layers of lacquer, Yamanaka lacquerware is characterized by a healthy and casual style that makes the most of the materials. This can only be done with the skillful technique of a craftsman.

This characteristic is also reflected in the tea canisters named "Karmi"; Karmi Tea Canisters are named after one of the haikai principles of the Edo period haiku poet Matsuo Basho, "Karumi (lightness)." It expresses the light-heartedness felt in everyday life without elaborating on knowledge or technique, and is connected to the philosophy of beautiful design that seems to exude from the inside.

Lacquerware tends to focus on the luxurious aspects of the exterior, such as maki-e, chinkin, and overglaze coating, but the most important part is the original wooden base. For the time being, Gato Mikio Shoten continues to produce products while maintaining the concept of fully emphasizing Yamanaka's rokuro techniques.

Gato Mikio Shoten’s Karmi Tea Canisters for Tea 100g Soji
https://www.shokunin.com/en/gato/karmi.html[Yamanaka Lacquerware]

Yamanaka lacquerware is the generic name for lacquerware made in the Yamanaka Onsen area of Kaga City, Ishikawa Prefecture. Gato Mikio Shoten was founded in 1908 as Gado Mokkojo (Woodworks). Inheriting the philosophy of a woodworker, the company has been manufacturing lacquerware with a focus on the perfection of the wood, the base of the lacquerware.

The foundation of Yamanaka lacquerware is the perfection of the wood. Yamanaka lacquerware's wipe lacquer finish, which is a thin coating of lacquer, is a finishing method that requires a good wood base in order to produce a product.

Such thinly lacquered lacquerware is recognized as inexpensive in the market, but the truth is that only Yamanaka lacquerware can produce this type of lacquerware. In contrast to staid lacquerware with thick layers of lacquer, Yamanaka lacquerware is characterized by a healthy and casual style that makes the most of the materials. This can only be done with the skillful technique of a craftsman.

This characteristic is also reflected in the tea canisters named "Karmi"; Karmi Tea Canisters are named after one of the haikai principles of the Edo period haiku poet Matsuo Basho, "Karumi (lightness)." It expresses the light-heartedness felt in everyday life without elaborating on knowledge or technique, and is connected to the philosophy of beautiful design that seems to exude from the inside.

Lacquerware tends to focus on the luxurious aspects of the exterior, such as maki-e, chinkin, and overglaze coating, but the most important part is the original wooden base. For the time being, Gato Mikio Shoten continues to produce products while maintaining the concept of fully emphasizing Yamanaka's rokuro techniques.

Gato Mikio Shoten’s Karmi Tea Canisters
https://www.shokunin.com/en/gato/karmi.html
Gato Mikio Shoten's Tohka Wine
https://www.shokunin.com/en/gato/tohka.html

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[Chirashi Sushi Is a Type of Sushi That Looks Like a Scoop Cake]

Chirashi sushi in a stacked box. It is one type of sushi that can be easily prepared at home, consisting of cooked rice mixed with vinegar, sugar, and salt, called "sumeshi (sushi rice)," and topped with a thinly sliced omelet, shrimp, pods of peas, shredded nori, and other ingredients.

The ingredients for chirashi sushi are optional, so you can use sashimi or vegetables to make your own chirashi sushi.

When I was looking at chirashi sushi, I thought it was similar to scoop cake. If you want to enjoy it with a large group of people, you can make a lot of them at the sushi rice stand.

A rice scoop soaked in water for a while will keep the rice from sticking to it. Take as much as you like and serve on a plate or bowl.

Matsuya Shikkiten's Shirakinuri Lunch Box
https://www.shokunin.com/en/matsuya/
Azmaya's Rice Scoop
https://www.shokunin.com/en/azmaya/miyajima.html
Appi Urushi Studio's Flat Bowl
https://www.shokunin.com/en/appi/bowl.html
Yamaichi's Sushi Handai
https://www.shokunin.com/en/yamaichi/sushi.html

Reference
https://www.justonecookbook.com/chirashi-sushi/

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[Hikifuda]

At the Osaka Museum of History I visited the other day, there was an exhibit that made me stop and look at it because of its unique design and beautiful colors. "Hikifuda" refers to advertising materials created from the Edo period to the Taisho era to advertise products and stores, similar to today's inserts, flyers, and handbills. There are various theories as to the origin of the word, but it is said to derive from the words "to draw" or "attract" customers.

In the early days, the number of colors was as few as one or two, and the name of the store or product was added to a blank space in a picture that had already been drawn. In the Meiji era, copper plate printing and lithographic printing techniques were introduced, and the style changed to one that retained the handmade look and feel, but was more colorful and incorporated bold designs. Many of these were produced by descendants of Edo period nishiki-e artists.

The most attractive feature of hikifuda is the soft, handmade texture that the handwritten letters, lovely illustrations, and rich colors provide. I feel that this is the greatest charm of hikifuda.

Teshigoto Forum's Japanese Handwork Calendar is made by printing stencil dyes on the subject of Japanese handicrafts by Koichi Odanaka. The warm and colorful pictures and text, unique to handmade calendars, are sure to bring comfort and brightness to your daily life. How about a calendar that will give you a sense of relief in your busy daily life?

Teshigoto Forum's Japanese Handwork Calendar
https://www.shokunin.com/en/teshigoto/calendar.html
Wakamatsu Showroom
https://www.shokunin.com/en/showroom/wakamatsu.html

References
https://www.admt.jp/collection/category/?category_id=4
https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/引き札
https://www.postalmuseum.jp/column/collection/post_9.html