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[Yoshita Handi-Design Studio's Tegakari has been added]

"Tegakari" is a cutting board made of a single piece of Japanese ginkgo wood, with an edge that is easy to lift with one hand and a beautiful shape that can be placed directly on the table.

The wood of ginkgo is suitable for cutting boards because it is light, drains well due to its moderate oil content, and dries quickly. Because of its softness and elasticity, it does not tire easily when used, and does not damage the blade of a knife.

The compact size, smaller than the plate on which the main dish is placed, makes it easy to use, wash, and dry.

Yoshita Handi-Design Studio's Tegakari
https://www.shokunin.com/en/yoshita/tegakari.html

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[Plain Hot Water and Enamel]

During seasonal changes in temperature, "plain hot water," which warms the body, may be a strong ally. Plain hot water has long been drunk in India, China, and Tibet, and appears to be a health practice derived from traditional medicine and folk remedies.

India has a traditional medicine called Ayurveda. Ayurveda is believed to balance the physical condition from the three energies (water, fire, and wind) of the body and mind, known as the "Tridosha." Plain hot water has three energy elements: kapha, the water element; pitta, the fire element of boiling; and vata, the wind element of the air bubbles created by boiling. Drinking plain hot water helps to maintain balance in the body.

In China, it is also customary to drink plain hot water. Traditional medicine, medical books, Chinese thought, and hygiene led to the culture of plain hot water, as health is related to body temperature, and if the internal organs function properly, there are no health concerns. Cold tea was actually reimported from Japan, and in China, there was no culture of drinking tea cold, and people drank hot tea to lower their body temperature by dissipating heat in the body through sweat.

In Tibet, a Tibetan medical proverb says, "The first disease is indigestion, the first medicine is plain hot water." When the stomach is deprived of heat, its ability to digest is weakened, and the energy to produce the human body itself is not produced. They say that regular consumption of ice water or cold food causes illness, so they avoid cold food, consume warm food, and keep the stomach warm. Although the climate of each region may have an influence, it is an ancient health wisdom to keep the body cool from within.

To make Ayurvedic plain hot water, once it comes to a boil, remove the lid and let it boil for 10-15 minutes without removing the lid. Air is added to the plain hot water by ventilating it and placing it on the fire as air bubbles are released. It is then cooled to a drinkable temperature and slowly drunk.

As for pots for making plain hot water, ironware, which supplies iron, and copperware, which is highly effective in sterilizing, are recommended, but enamel pots are easy to clean and can easily be used to make white water. The smooth surface material of enamel is an inorganic glassy glaze baked onto a metal surface. Enamel has the advantages of both metal and glass in terms of thermal conductivity, corrosion resistance, heat resistance, and scratch resistance, and is used for road signs and whiteboards, as well as many household items. And enamel material does not change the taste and flavor of food because it is difficult for bacteria to grow and does not undergo chemical changes. It is also suitable for storing pickles and jams because it is resistant to strong odors, salt and acid, and can be used over an open flame or in an oven because of its resistance to heat.

We wish you a warm body and a pleasant change of season.

Tsukiusagi's Slim Pot
https://www.shokunin.com/en/tsukiusagi/ 

References
https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/白湯
https://youtu.be/5Yoz8Z60Da4
https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/アーユルヴェーダ
https://www.tibethouse.jp/about/science/medicine/
https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/琺瑯
http://www.eco-union.jp/summary/booklet/vol43/open43_1.html

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[Olive Oil]

Olives are believed to have originated around Anatolia, and spread from Syria through Turkey to Greece between the 14th and 12th centuries BC. Since ancient times, olives have been valued as a raw material for olive oil, and with the discovery of the Americas at the end of the 15th century, olive cultivation was introduced across the Atlantic to countries in South America. It is now grown in South Africa, Australia, China, and Japan, far from its birthplace.

Olive oil was first brought to Japan about 400 years ago during the Azuchi-Momoyama period. It was carried by a Portuguese priest who came to Japan to evangelize Christianity. Therefore, at that time, olive oil was called "Porto oil," a corruption of "Portuguese oil." Incidentally, the olive-like plant called horutonoki comes from the Edo period scholar Hiraga Gennai, who mistakenly referred to this tree as an olive tree in his book "Trees in Portugal."

After the Meiji Restoration, the government, with its policy of promoting industrial development, attempted to import plants and animals from overseas for breeding and cultivation in Japan, and as part of this effort, olive trees and other plants were first cultivated in Kobe in 1878. A few years later, they were able to extract olive oil, but the business did not last long due to financial difficulties.

Later, as Japan's north-sea fisheries flourished and demand for olive oil for canning increased, in 1908 the Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce designated Mie, Kagawa, and Kagoshima prefectures to begin trial olive cultivation. Of these, only Shodo Island in Kagawa Prefecture has succeeded in cultivating olives, and today, approximately 87% of domestically produced olives are harvested in Kagawa Prefecture.

The warm and dry climate of the Seto Inland Sea is similar to that of the Mediterranean coast, where olive cultivation has flourished, and Shodo Island has been actively engaged in olive production for more than 110 years.

THE's Soy Sauce Cruet
https://www.shokunin.com/en/the/ 
Yoshita Handi-Design Studio's Cheese Board
https://www.shokunin.com/en/yoshita/cheese.html 

References
https://www.pref.kagawa.lg.jp/noshishozu/noshi_olive/kagawa.html
https://www.pref.kagawa.lg.jp/tokei/sogo/udonken/1001.html
https://shimamura1842.jp/olive-about/world_of_olive/japan/
https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/オリーブ
https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/ホルトノキ