1

2

3

[Make My Flavor Jam]

Do you know the difference between "jam" and "confiture?" "Jam" is an English word and "confiture" is a French word, and, specifically, "jam" is when the fruit is boiled down to a jelly-like consistency, while "confiture" is when it is light and preserves the shape of the fruit to some extent.

The jelly-like thickening characteristic of jam is produced when acid and sugar mix with pectin, which is abundant in fruit peels. Jam, as the name implies, seems to be sizzling and concentrated. Confiture uses less sugar than jam, and this one is derived from the French word "confit" meaning "to marinate in oil or sugar" and its preparation method.

Professional pastry chefs and other confectioners use copper pots for jams because their high thermal conductivity allows them to cook evenly in a short time, resulting in bright colors and fresh, flavorful results.

For home cooking, it is nice to have the freedom to turn unsweetened or uneaten fruit into jam, or use your own preferred sugar, without having to buy it for preserving purposes. We think the joy of cooking is to create "my taste" with ingenuity.

Nakamura Douki's Yukihira Pot
https://www.shokunin.com/en/nakamuradouki/yukihira.html 
Okubo House Mokkosha's Jam Spoon
https://www.shokunin.com/en/okubo/jam.html 
Koizumi Glass's Canister
https://www.shokunin.com/en/koizumi/canister.html 

References
https://theokuratokyo.jp/letter/pastry/article-05/#:~:text=%E3%82%B8%E3%83%A3%E3%83%A0%E3%81%AF%E8%8B%B1%E8%AA%9E%E3%81%A7%E3%80%8C%E8%A9%B0%E3%82%81%E8%BE%BC%E3%82%80,%E3%81%A6%E3%81%84%E3%81%AA%E3%81%84%E3%81%93%E3%81%A8%E3%82%82%E3%81%82%E3%82%8A%E3%81%BE%E3%81%99%E3%80%82
https://kinarino.jp/cat4-グルメ/13350-覚えておきたいね%E3%80%82旬の果物を使ったジャムの作り方%E3%80%82
https://www.olive-hitomawashi.com/column/2018/11/post-2762.html
https://www.1101.com/store/oragajam/2014/recipe_ac.html

1

2

3

4

Bamboo shoots, with their refreshing texture, are representative of the foods that are in season in spring. "Bamboo shoots" refers to those that have sprouted within 10 days; after that, they become bamboo, and thus, they are a truly "seasonal" food that is consumed within a limited period of time.

Bamboo shoots are an indispensable ingredient in Japanese cuisine. In fact, there is a record that it has beehn eaten since ancient times, as recorded in the Kojiki (Records of Ancient Matters). The bamboo shoots currently in circulation are mainly called moso bamboo, which originated in China and were introduced to Satsuma (now Kagoshima Prefecture) from the Jiangnan region via Ryukyu (now Okinawa Prefecture) in around 1736.

Bamboo shoots are a vegetable that can be grilled, steamed, simmered, or served with rice to enjoy its tart texture, but they are also attracting attention as a health and diet food. In addition to being low in calories, it is high in dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals such as potassium and zinc, which produce salt. It is also rich in glutamic acid and other umami ingredients, and contains nutrients comparable to those of onions and cabbage. The tips are said to be higher in hormones and nutrients, and the closer to the base, the richer in fiber and protein.

Bamboo shoot dishes are relatively easy to prepare at home and are delicious. Bamboo shoots are a perfect match for miso and sansho, and are perfect in a miso soup, and with their subtle sweetness, bamboo shoots are a popular dish for men and women of all ages. The most special of all is bamboo shoot rice, which has been eaten since the mid-Edo period, which is made by adding pre-cooked bamboo shoots, carrots, shiitake mushrooms, and other vegetables to rice and cooking it together.

Rice cooked with bamboo shoots will taste even better if it is served in Kurikyu's Magewappa Ohitsu, which allows you to enjoy the fragrance of Akita cedar. The chewy texture and sweetness of the dish allows you to fully enjoy spring, so please try it out.

Kurikyu's Magewappa Ohitsu
https://www.shokunin.com/en/kurikyu/ohitsu.html
Seiryugama's Rice Bowl
https://www.shokunin.com/en/seiryu/chawan.html
Hakusan Porcelain's Hirachawan
https://www.shokunin.com/en/hakusan/hirachawan.html

References
http://kyoudo-ryouri.com/food/1767.html
https://weathernews.jp/s/topics/202005/030065/
https://www.maff.go.jp/j/keikaku/syokubunka/k_ryouri/search_menu/menu/takenoko_gohan_miyagi.html
https://www.chikumo.co.jp/culture

1

2

3

4

One of the characteristics of the Kyoto people's way of life is the spirit of "shimatsu" that has been cultivated over the long history of the city. It is a spirit that has been advocated since ancient times mainly in the Kansai region, meaning to cherish things, not to waste, and to save and economize, which also includes the meaning of "use things while they are usable even if they are a little old" and "use things properly until the end."

Obanzai, recognized as a genre of Kyoto cuisine, refers to side dishes that are eaten daily in Kyoto. Obanzai, which includes side dishes made from dried foods such as kiriboshi-daikon and hijiki, as well as seasonal vegetables, played an important role in Kyoto, where fresh seafood was difficult to obtain, and developed under the influence of Zen Buddhist food culture.

However, is also thought that one of the factors that contributed to the development of obanzai was the spirit of "shimatsu" of the Kyoto people. The character "ban" in "obanzai" means "daily" or "humble," and it is a cuisine that has been nurtured in the annual events and customs of each town and household, along with the modest lifestyle of merchants and apprentices who believed in frugality and thrift.

The spirit of "shimatsu" nurtured by Kyoto's food culture and lifestyle customs has an ethos of Japanese lifestyles that is also applicable to the UN's development goals, the SDGs, for the creation of a sustainable society. Among these, the issue of food loss, which has long been considered a social problem and came to the forefront with the pandemic, can be addressed by finding ways to reduce waste through the use of surplus ingredients and systematic cooking by having the spirit of "shimatsu."

We have a large selection of artifacts that will become more tasteful as they are used over time. Honma Kazuo Shoten's Straw Pot Stand, made by traditional handwork in Sado Island, Niigata Prefecture, changes its color over time, into a profound dark brown. Appi Urushi Studio's Nidan Himeju, high-quality lacquerware lunch box made in Hachimantai City, Iwate Prefecture, produces beautiful gloss and luster through daily use. Please feel the passage of time as you use the tools of daily life.

Ichiyougama's Mortar
https://www.shokunin.com/en/ichiyou/suribachi.html
Honma Kazuo Shoten's Straw Pot Stand
https://www.shokunin.com/en/honma/nabeshiki.html
Appi Urushi Studio's Nidan Himeju
https://www.shokunin.com/en/appi/jubako.html
Sunami Toru Shoten's Ikago
https://www.shokunin.com/en/sunami/ikago.html

References
https://kyotolove.kyoto/I0000203
https://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXZQOUD222Z70S1A420C2000000/
https://kotobank.jp/word/%E3%81%8A%E3%81%B0%E3%82%93%E3%81%96%E3%81%84-1725769